Franklintown, United States, North America
 
 
Year1971latitude: 39° 57'
longitude: -75° 10'
Period
Initiator(s)
Planning organization
Nationality initiator(s)
Designer(s) / Architect(s)Philip Johnson
John Burgee
Design organization
Inhabitants3,390 (2008)
Target population14,000
Town website
Town related linkshttp://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,909886,00.html
http://www.city-data.com/neighborhood/Franklintown-Philadelphia-PA.html
Literature- * Hugh Mields, 'Federally Assisted New Communities. New Dimensions in Urban Development', Washington 1973

- * 'An Old City's New Town', Time magazine, Jun. 14, 1971

type of New Town: > scale of autonomy
New-Town-in-Town
Satellite
New Town
Company Town
> client
Private Corporation
Public Corporation
> policy
Capital
Decentralization
Industrialization
Resettlement
Economic
 
Franklin Town, Pennsylvania, is a new-town-in-town in Philadelphia and started out as privately financed by five major corporations: Smith Kline & French, I-T-E Imperial Corp., the Korman Corp., Butcher & Sherrerd and Philadelphia Electric Co.

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Streets for People. Scheduled for completion in the 1980s, Franklin Town will include 4,000 housing units in a wide range of prices, plus offices, shops, hotels and parks. By clustering and mixing these activities, Architect-Planners Philip Johnson and John Burgee hope to keep the new town bustling by day and night. Indeed, Johnson describes the urban project as 'by far the most exciting in the world today.'
One important feature of the plan is a spacious 'town square.' Another is a shop-and-theater-lined boulevard cutting diagonally through Philadelphia's rectangular grid of streets that will act as a sort of glorified main street, a gathering point for the community. Since the boulevard will mainly serve only Franklin Town rather than the whole city, auto traffic will be light. Says Philip Johnson: 'The streets must be primarily built for people and secondarily for cars.' To stress that notion, the plan provides a system of pedestrian walkways, called greenways, in the old Philadelphia tradition.

source: 'An Old City's New Town', Time magazine, Jun. 14, 1971

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