Lilongwe, Malawi, Africa
 
 
Year1947latitude: -13° 58'
longitude: 33° 46'
Period
Initiator(s)Town Planning Department, Capital City Development Corporation
Planning organization
Nationality initiator(s)Malawian
Designer(s) / Architect(s)
Design organization
Inhabitants1,000,000
Target population
Town websitehttp://www.llcitycouncil.org/
Town related linkshttp://www.kumbalilodge.com/lilongwe/
https://www.expertafrica.com/malawi/lilongwe
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lilongwe
https://blogs.oxfam.org/en/blogs/15-11-26-inequality-malawi-dangerous-divid e
https://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/file_attachments/rr-inequal ity-in-malawi-261115-en.pdf
https://www.expertafrica.com/malawi/lilongwe
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTn04mv45JQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Djh9TO6NUEA
Literature- MALAWI. MINISTRY OF INFORMATION AND BROADCASTING, CAPITAL CITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, Lilongwe, new capital city.
- DEBORAH POTTS, Capital Relocation in Africa: The Case of Lilongwe in Malawi, The Geographical Journal
- Vol. 151, No. 2 (Jul., 1985), pp. 182-196

type of New Town: > scale of autonomy
New-Town-in-Town
Satellite
New Town
Company Town
> client
Private Corporation
Public Corporation
> policy
Capital
Decentralization
Industrialization
Resettlement
Economic
 
The Malawian Government announced the decision to move its capital from lomba to Lilongwe in 1965, a year after the Independence. The reason for a capital relocation was the desire for a new central location, greater regional equality and the achievement of political aims. A first plan by a firm of South African architects was received in 1967, but it was considered unsuitable for the needs of the local economy still undeveloped.
A new plan was drawn up by the Town Planning Department: the government aim was that to create a “garden capital city” for a population expected to reach some 500.000 inhabitants by 2000.
The first construction works began in 1969, in the government administrative site. However the development of the town proceeded unequally and many zones remained undeveloped. Most of the areas lack an intermixing of uses, moreover financial constraints have prevented the housing program from keeping the pace with the rapid population grown, generating conflict with the city population.
Even transports represent another problem in the city of Lilongwe, due to the cost of public transport service, inaccessible for a large part of inhabitants.
Nowadays Lilongwe has a population of around 1 million and it is facing the problem of a fair and equitable distribution of income and wealth as many other African cities. The main disparities concern the difficulty in land access, education, health and economic opportunities, not just between urban and rural people, but also between man and women of the same origin.

source: http://www.llcitycouncil.org/

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